Chateau Pey La Tour 2012 Bordeaux

August 27, 2015 § 1 Comment

Price: $16.49 ($19.06 including taxes and deposit)Chateau Pey La Tour 2012

Score: 6.5

Bordeaux has always been a mystery of sorts to me. My first experiences with it, unlike those of Chianti Classico, were not impressive at all. I found the wines, that I could afford, to be thin, tannic and not worthy of the heaps of praise and pretty penny the wines of Bordeaux receive. That is until I tried the great wines of Bordeaux and I quickly found out that if you are willing to pay top dollar ($800-$3000/bottle) you will always get a wonderful wine, however it is only in the best of Bordeaux vintages, does the lovely seductive body, perfumes and flavours of classic Bordeaux, transcend to the affordability of the everyday.

I spent a Sunday morning reading what I think is the world’s best wine periodical, Decanter, and it was all about Bordeaux. As my mouth started to water I took the decision to enjoy a bottle of Bordeaux that very evening. Being a relative neophyte I contacted a friend of mine who makes a living at choosing the great from the average in Bordeaux. She counselled me to select the 2012 instead of the 2011 and I am glad that I did.

The 2012 Chateau Pey La Tour is a¬†fine wine and a very enjoyable expression of the ‘Right Bank’ (Merlot focussed) wines of Bordeaux. Lovely aromas, good body, supple long finish, complexity of flavours and structure. Yup enjoyable, however at close to $20 I’m expecting more than what I would get out of a Bordelaise wines like Chateau de Courtleliac ($13) or Chateau La Gorce ($13). I really liked it, was thankful for the experience, but as an everyday wine the value is in the lower priced wines.

Purchased At: BC Liquor Stores

Section: France

Cork Closure

Food: Steak, roasted red meats, hearty casseroles; Foodie Wine

Grapes: Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon

Advertisements

Cecchi 2011 Chianti Classico

August 25, 2015 § Leave a comment

Price: $17.99 ($20.79 taxes & deposit included)Cechi Chianti Classico

Score: 6.3

Full disclosure, Chianti and Chianti Classico is a true love of mine. I’m not sure how or when, but the supple texture, rich seductive body, cherry flavours, floral elements along with savoury spices are a baseline for me. I can easily sink into a glass of Chianti Classico like a great book.

$20+ for Chianti Classico is t be expected and thus I’m looking for it to deliver more than a simple Chianti or Sangiovese at $15. When I say more I don’t mean more density or stronger flavours, rather I’m looking for greater complexity of flavours and structure. I’m looking for find more flavours and flavours that work together. I’m looking for a more supple and seductive bottle that what I am likely to find in a $15 wine. Sadly I didn’t find that here. Don’t get me wrong, there is lots to like and love in this wine, but it is not that dissimilar to the flavours and texture found in regular Chiantis such as Gabbiano, Cecchi and Frescobaldi.

Purchased At: BC Liquor Stores

Section: Italy

Cork Closure

Foods: Pastas, Pizza, roasted chicken or pork, hard cheeses, comfort foods and foodie foods.

Alta Luna Phases

August 20, 2015 § Leave a comment

Price: $14.59 ($16.88 incl. taxes & deposit) *this wine is on sale to $13.59 for the month of Aug.Alta Luna Phases

Score: 7.1

I get a strong sense that consumers are starting to look for more finesse in their wines. They are starting to move away from the big boozy juice bombs that laden the liquor store shelves. Inevitably this leads the consumer to European wines for the most part and if that path leads to Italy it likely means tasting wines made from grapes that are not household names. This wine is just such an offering.

It hails from the Alto Adige region of Northern which is nestled in the Dolomite mountains, and is a blend of Teroldego, Lagrein and Merlot. See what I mean. I have been tasting wines for 20+ years and I can only recall tasting Lagrein once or twice and I have never had the pleasure of tasting Teroldego.

I poured a glass right after pulling the cork. I loved the perfumed, berry, floral nose but the wine seemed really shy on the palate to the point where only its structure was at play. I put the wine aside for a couple of days and that did the trick. Clearly this is a wine that needs a lot of breathing (Vinturi, decanting, or simply leaving it open for a good amount of time) because it totally opened up and showed bright fresh berry and plum fruit flavours along with floral and spicy notes. The finish didn’t show any of the harsh tannins I noted on the first pass. I loved this wine… after a few days.

I would have scored this wine higher but the reality is that most people want to dive into their bottle and don’t purchase their wine to have two nights from now. So in terms of real life value its okay. In terms of cork dork value, this is awesome!

Purchased At: BC Liquor Stores

Section: Italy

Cork Closure

Food: Steak, roasted meats, cheeses, rustic breads. Could work for Foodie foods and comfort foods.

A Word About Pricing

August 18, 2015 § 3 Comments

This is something new for the blog and I will look to post something of this nature each month… unless you tell me not to. Let me know what you think.

As you know this blog is dedicated to reviewing wines under $20 but the cruel reality is that what is $20 in BC is $15 in Alberta or $8 in California, so I thought I would throw my two cents in as to why I think our pricing in BC is not only a detriment to the economy but also creates negative consumption behaviour instead of curtailing it.

For years the industry has criticized the government about its mark-up/tax structure in BC. It’s a structure that sees you and me pay some of the highest prices for wine, beer and spirits in North America. The question has long been why?

Close to a century ago BC, like other provinces in Canada and states in the US, shed the legal cloak of Prohibition in favour of control over pricing, regulation and distribution. Here in BC the government determined that high prices, and therefore high taxation, would limit consumption, specifically the kind of conspicuous consumption that leads to a tearing of the social fabric, and if that didn’t work, they would make booze hard to get.

Here is the, perhaps unintended, assumption underlying high prices; rich people don’t create problems associated with alcohol only poor people do.

There isn’t any evidence anywhere that shows higher prices curtail negatives for the long term. The stigma about drinking and driving has become entrenched in our culture and that had nothing to do with pricing. Consumers in California don’t drink 5 times more because their prices are 20% of ours. In fact they have similar consumption to us, but a more vibrant and diverse wine culture that has spawned numerous economic opportunities that couldn’t possibly exist here.

Positive culture no matter if surrounds a society, sport, food or wine is not born of elites and graciously handed down to those less fortunate. Quite the contrary. History shows us that the culture that defines a nation or group comes from the ground up. In addition our culture is the cornerstone of our economic wealth. By entrenching high prices we secure the negative aspects of alcohol consumption and become impotent at solving the root causes, while making government increasingly dependent on the tax dollars that flow each year into general revenue and squelching innovation and investment.

What changes to make? My suggestion is start with a flat tax instead of an ad volerum tax. Second insure that the rules are applied equally to all those who choose to participate in the industry. Third, remove the government monopoly on distribution. After that pour yourself a glass of your favourite wine, sit down and relax… BC will be a better place.

These are just my thoughts, but I would love to hear yours.

Cheers

The Dork UnCorked

 

 

Trevini Primo Merlot-Primitivo

August 17, 2015 § Leave a comment

Price: $12.99 ($15.04 Taxes and Deposit Included)Trevini Primo

Score: 6.7

Overall this is a very simple wine to enjoy. It is fruit forward, soft and supple and if you are looking for something easy to go with a simple comfort food meal this is a good choice.

Having said that I personally want a little complexity for my $15. I love a good Merlot and a good Primitivo, and together there is a ton of potential. Outside of the fruit and texture it didn’t do much. Certainly it is better than a number of $15 competitors but is not my first comfort food/pasta choice in this category.

Purchased From: BC Liquor Stores (I suspect this is an exclusive to BC Liquor Stores)

Section: Italy

Foods: Pasta, Burgers, Mac N Cheese

Where Am I?

You are currently viewing the archives for August, 2015 at Dorkuncorked's Blog.

%d bloggers like this: