October’s Budget Busters

October 23, 2016 § Leave a comment

The data shows that household spending drops well below the annual average in the weeks following Thanksgiving up until the 3rd week of November.

The fact is that you don’t have to give a good glass of wine with dinner or after a hard day, you just have to find the best of the ones that fit your budget.

What follows is a list of 3 whites and 3 reds that provide great value and don’t break the bank.

Whites

Jean Louis Blancs de Blancs (Sparkling) – An everyday Sparkling wine. Yeah that’s right anJean Louis everyday sparkling wine to celebrate life’s small victories. Delightful ripe apple and pear, a very decent mousse for the price. Just a fine glass of wine for the price. ~ Score 8.2/10 ($12.99-$14.99)

Cono Sur Gewurztraminer – For those who enjoy a lighter style wine that is a touch sweeter. This is a light bodied quaffer that shows flavours of lychee nut, white peach and pear. ~ Score 7.9/10 ($9.99 – $11.99)

Lindemans Bin 65 Chardonnay – A richer wine that embodies the sun of the country it comes from. Tropical fruit flavours with a touch of caramel on the finish. I love this wine as it has not really changed its price since the wine came into the market back in the early 90’s. ~ Score 7.8/10 ($10.99-$12.99)

Reds

Giacondi Sangiovese Merlot – Buy this one by the 1.5L (Magnum) as it works out to being IMG_0681about $6/Bottle. This wine is one of the most consistent and best values on the Market. Cherry, berry and plum flavours with a medium body. Do me a favour, let this wine breathe for 15-30min. before enjoying. If you do you will be handsomely rewarded. ~Score 7.9/10 ($11.99 1.5L)

Tocado Grenache – This is a super juicy, ripe wine and it will be tough to stop at one glass. Ripe raspberry, currant and blueberry flavours with a gentle soft palate. I know you can get this at Cascadia stores for $11.99 and $9.99 if you buy it by the case… and it is worth buying by the case. ~ Score 7.8/10 ($9.99-$11.99)

Terra Andina Carmenere-Syrah – I would be hard pressed to find another wine of structure that provides better bang for the buck. The Tocado above is all about juicy-ness and a soft palate, this wine has some structure and is filled with plum, blackberry and cassis. ~ Score 7.6/10 ($9.99- $12.99)

Cheers

Dork UnCorked

Q and A: Show Notes Episode 17

February 20, 2016 § Leave a comment

In episode 17 we work to answer a number of questions as posted by you to either our blog, Facebook page, Twitter or email.¬†Shout Outs, How To Taste Like A Pro, Best Apps, Carol’s Question and Best Buy of the Week. Enjoy and let us know what you think.

Link to Podcast

Segment 1 ~ Shout Outs

Street Cleaners – I’m a cyclist and at this time of the year the streets are grimy and the bike lanes filled with debris from the passing traffic. I raise a glass to those who clean the streets as it is amazing how a clean street can be the difference between a great day and an awful one.

Super Bowl 50 – In the days following the big game Sopexa, the international Communication and Marketing Agency that handles the Wines of France, published some very interesting stats. Super Bowl 50 was the event that saw the most significant one day increase in wine consumption in the last number of years. I raise a glass to those who have contributed to making this event more than just a game, but an event that brings family and friends together.

Karyn Stewart – Call any liquor store or restaurant around town, call her peers and you will all hear the same thing. Karyn is one of the best reps of all time and Mark Anthony Brands is very lucky to have her. The difference is that she is a great listener and very smart. All too often reps believe its their job to deliver a diatribe about how great their product is. Karyn, by contrast listens to the buyer and pinpoints their needs and advocates on their behalf. I raise a glass to Karyn Stewart for her incredible ability to build relationships and let them blossom.

John, Greg, Amelia, Tamarra & Paul – I raise a glass to each of you for your questions, please keep them coming. In fact it is your questions that forms the body of today’s show.

Segment 2 ~ How To Taste Like A Pro

I get lots of questions about how to taste a wine like a pro. For the most part the nature of the question is ‘how do you taste all those things in wine?’ There is a technique that will bring out more of the character and flavour of any wine. To really see the difference you will need to have 2 glasses.

First the Swirl.

Pour a couple of ounces of your wine into each of two glasses.

Take one of the glasses, remember which glass, and swirl the wine around in the glass. Now pick up the non-swirl glass and take a big whiff. Now take the swirl glass and take a big whiff. See that? There is more in the swirl glass right? You are going to do the same thing with tasting.

Take the non-swirl glass and take a sip as you usually would. Now take the swirl glass and take a sip but hold it in your mouth, swirl it around and now take a breathe in through your mouth (purse your lips and breathe in), then swallow or spit. What did you notice? You likely got more of the flavour, texture and finish of the wine. If you do that with every sip you will notice how the wine changes with time and air.

Segment 3 – Best Apps for Wine & Beer

Thanks to Greg and Amelia for asking ‘what are the best apps for wine and beer?’

For me there are too many apps that do the same thing so for recording what I taste there are two that I use. One of which, I’m sure many of you already use – Evernote. I use this the most as it allows me to take a picture of the label and make some simple notes about the wine. Then I tag the post with where I tasted it, the region the wine is from, it’s colour and grape(s). This allows me to go back and search by any of the tags if I have forgotten the name of the wine.

The specifically wine app that is also great for recording what you have tasted, rating it and seeing what your friends have tried is Vivino. For me this app allows me to see what some of the best Sommeliers in the world are tasting. Most of that would be way out of my price range, but I do get to see some of the trends happening within the trade and some better vintage information.

For craft beer there is no better app than Untappd. It is widely used by enthusiasts all over the world and the reviews are believable as they are written by consumers and not trade or suppliers.

The last app I will mention is a game and a wine and spirits education all at the same time. It was created by the Society of Wine Educators and is a regular diversion for yours truly. It’s called Wine Quiz and anyone will get something out of it.

Segment 4 ~ Carol’s Questions

For this you will have to either click on the link to the podcast or listen to the show.

Buy of the Week ~ Tormaresca Castel del Monte Trentangeli – $18

Wow, big, mouthfilling juicy fruit, blackberries, blueberries, currants all in bowl with some black pepper, earthy, soul enriching goodness and some butter pastry on the side.

 

Is Re-Stocking Eating Your Profits?

August 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

It is no secret that margins are thin. This is especially true if you operate a private retail store in BC.

It is also true that you nor your staff work in a vacuum and that all actions and efforts will have an effect on your bottom line.

Re-stocking shelves is one of the critical cost centres in your store that is often over looked. How much labour are you putting into restocking shelves? The answer is as simple as this mathematical formula and it could save you thousands of dollars per year in labour and out of stock costs.

Weekly Sales / Shelf Capacity = ReStocking required.

Cheers

The DorkUncorked

Was this helpful? Either way say so in the comments.

If I can help you determine your restocking costs and how to make your inventory work harder for you, you can reach me at rodphillips@telus.net or by phone at 250-880-0072

LRS Operators: Top 5 Ways to Increase Your Bottom Line

August 5, 2014 § Leave a comment

The following is not sexy or glamourous. It doesn’t involve fancy lunches, travel or even snazzy software. In fact you likely have all the ingredients currently at your fingertips.

#1 Weekly Shelf Adjustments to accommodate new products, seasonal transitions, and changing market conditions.
This is definitely not sexy, but has a ton of impact. Studies over the last 50 years have all concluded the same thing. Consistent adjustments can lead to 3-5% increase in your bottom line per year.

#2 Re-organize your data into categories that best reflect your brand and your customers.
Every LRS fills a unique market position and has a different consumer base. Why your customers shop with you should be reflected in the categories you analyze. Looking at your business in the same way as everyone else only tells your staff and your customers that you are no different. Creating clear points of distinction not only creates loyal customers but is also the best way to increase your profits.

#3 Establish timely and simple measurements to stay on top of changes in consumer preferences.
Customers tastes and demands can change on a dime, not responding to these changes means you can’t possibly have the right product, at the right time and at the right price. Establishing simple and timely measurements can point to budding trends and therefore new opportunities to profit.

#4 Re-establish win-win relationships with vendors by managing categories and not products.
New product introductions, promotions, and pricing actions will have impact over entire categories and not just on one product. By effectively managing categories you create situations where the vendor wins, your bottom line wins and, more importantly, your customer wins.

#5 Know which LTO’s to pass along and when.
This is remarkably simple to do and can save you a ton of wasted price reductions. It is amazing how much money is needlessly lost by pushing through price reductions without first understanding how much a product needs to increase its sales to breakeven.

If you would like more details on these just let me know via the comments or by contacting me at rodphillips@telus.net or calling me at 1-250-800-0072

Cheers

DorkUncorked

Tasting Notes UnCorked: McWatters Collection 2007 Meritage ~ $25CDN

August 31, 2011 § Leave a comment

McWatters Collection 2007 Meritage

This wine has just been released to the market in test tube full amounts… unless you are a high end restaurant in downtown Vancouver. Then.. then you can have as much as you want. Why? that is a discussion for another time.

McWatters Collection 2007 Meritage is the latest in a long line of projects started, elevated and polished by one Harry McWatters. Harry is truly one of the pioneers of the BC wine industry and was among the first to pull off producing commerical wine in BC. He is also a founding member of VQA in Canada and only recently completed some, what I suspect were hard, years at Vincor as part of the deal that saw Vincor purchase Sumac Ridge Winery from Harry. Harry is also responsible for making a wine that was a watershed wine in so many ways to the BC wine industry. Harry grew and vinted Sumac Ridge Gewurztraminer which was the wine that brought my wife and I together for a candle light nite (she was my soon to be girlfriend at the time). Regardless of that the Sumac Ridge Gewurz added credibility to the BC Wine industry that was desperate for some commercial wins. Frankly, I believe that the Sumac Ridge Gewurz established a style that became a standard to either emulate or run away from in BC. I can remember a conversation with Sandra Oldfield back in 1995 where she stated that she wanted her Gewurz to stand apart from Harry’s whereas so many wanted to copy.

Another thing you need to know about Harry. Never call a Meritage a Meritah-ge. He will jump down your throat and stomp on your innards. For Harry Meritage is pronounced Merry- tige. He believes in this so much that he either founded or was a very vocal member in an organization of Meritage maker’s (whose real name escapes me right now) that spans across North America.

So the McWatters Collection 2007 Meritage…
Here is the tech shit: Harvested in 2007 from blah blah blah blah vineyards. I have thrown that in there because it seems that every wine is grown in especially selected vineyards and is cared for as if gold from the vineyard to the winery, to the bottle to your table. To use a line I love from old black and white movies – that line is a bromide for the masses. What is really of any importance is why he chose the final blend to be 60% Merlot, 35% Cabernet Sauvignon and 5% Cabernet Franc and decided to leave in barrel and bottle for as long as he did before he released it. That is what I want to read and hear as each of those elements made up the wine that I tasted.

I first tasted the wine on August 21. I opened it at about 6pm and had a glass with dinner at about 6:30. I have to say that it didn’t wow me at that point. Don’t get me wrong the wine was technically sound and enjoyable but it didn’t have that little bit of Gretzky in it to put it over a lot of others at the same price point. If I had to score it at that time I would have given in a 6.5/$1 on my bang for the buck scale. Nice fruit flavours and aromas of red and black berries, some jammy elements, some good spicy undertones and enough grip to stand up to a bold meal, but not too much to pucker your face in. On the finish there was the tiniest of noises as if I was Horton and I was hearing a Who for the first time. The Who was saying in a shrinking voice “cocoa” “fresh ground coffee”.

Since then it has been sitting on my countertop with a vaccu-pump seal. That is 9 days it should have been well on its way to Balsamic by now but man o man was I surprised. It was still quite voluptuous, full of fruit and not loss of sex at all. Those tiny voices were now big Gregory Peck type tones from To Kill Mocking Bird. The finish was delightful and begging me to get up for another glass. Now, after 9 days I would score it an easy 8.5/$1. Any wine that has that lasting power deserves room in my pocketbook and miserable excuse for a cellar.

Conclusion: Buy!!!

Traditional Food Pairing: Beef Tenderloin hot of the grill with the simplest of seasoning. Roast Beef. Stilton Cheese on a Triscuit.

Junk Food Pairing: Jack’s Links Regular Beef Jerky or you can go with the Peppered. If Popcorn is on the agenda make sure that it is Orville’s Extra Butter flavour. Cheez Whiz is pretty decent with this to.

Availability: Pretty limited which is the drawback. You will be able to find it in key restaurants in Vancouver, some private retail in Victoria (in about a week) and throughout the Okanagan.

Cheers

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with DorkUnCorked at Dorkuncorked's Blog.

%d bloggers like this: